Tent court hearings for illegal aliens help alleviate process at Texas border

OAN NewsroomUPDATED 8:11 AM PT — Wednesday, September 18, 2019
Homeland Security just sent some 42,000 migrants back to Mexico as they set up dozens of tent courts near the border to work through the backlog of immigrants seeking asylum in America.
Immigration and Border Enforcement officials say the nearly $155 million tent courts in Texas are where hearings are held for deported Mexican migrants. It’s all part of the ‘Remain in Mexico’ policy, which the Trump administration claims is an alternative to separating and detaining families in the U.S. This is an alternative Mexico appears to be warming up to.
“We are trying to get the government of Mexico to expand their time that they will bring people here and accept people, so we can get more people through the system. But I can assure you we’re working with the government of Mexico, their assurance on their side are the same here. When they come across the U.S. border, we do everything we can to ensure their safety. The government of Mexico is doing the same thing.”
— Mark Morgan, Acting Commissioner – U.S. Customs and Border Protection
Critics argue the tent courts could be confusing for attorneys of detained migrants because of its obscurity and unconventional set up.

Migrants who are applying for asylum in the United States go through a processing area at a new tent courtroom at the Migration Protection Protocols Immigration Hearing Facility, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, in Laredo, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
However, President Trump sees the issue from another perspective as he touted his administration’s commitment to securing the nation’s borders using every tool at their disposal. He specifically praised the president of Mexico for his efforts to curb the many Mexican migrants who make their way to the U.S. illegally.
“And I want to just tell you that Mexico is doing a great job for us on the border, and I want to thank the president of Mexico,” stated the president.
President Trump also extended that gratitude to border officials who are helping judges work through the backlog of cases that’s inching closer to one million.
U.S. officials say having facilities like these along the entire southwest border is the end goal, which is an objective the Trump administration hopes will help streamline the nation’s immigration process.
A U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer checks the documents of migrants who are on their way to apply for asylum in the United States, on International Bridge 1 as they depart Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, early Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019. Tent courtrooms opened Monday in two Texas border cities to help process thousands of migrants who are being forced by the Trump administration to wait in Mexico while their requests for asylum wind through clogged immigration courts. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = ‘https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js#xfbml=1’; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’));


Source link